After face/neck lift and platysmaplasty, I have some neck skin laxity on either side of the midline repair – can this be fixed?

Dr. Dean Kane Q & A Q. I am 6 months post-op, the laxity either side of platysmaplasty repair is really bothering me. If I pull this skin backward towards the lower ear, it smooths out nicely. Can this be revised by re-opening the incisions behind my ear (& maybe the submental incision), or will the incisions in front of the ears/temples also need to be re-opened? Will a lot of undermining be required & is it a relatively simple procedure? Any risks regarding creating more scar tissue, and recurrence of skin laxity?   A. ​The desire to have shorter scars, faster surgery and faster recovery has left face and neck lift patients with residual skin laxity and redundancy which a more formal or traditional face and neck lift would have redraped and removed. Some patients have the quality of skin that quickly relaxes as well and previously would require a secondary face and neck lift or revision. Today, the ThermiRF platform provides skin shrinkage and skin tightening using radio-frequency energy. Prior technology depended on emitting laser, light, ultrasound and other forms of energy through the skin to achieve tightening. As you may know, pain, underwhelming results or complications have been troublesome for these other machines. By monitoring the heat from outside the skin, inside the skin and the resistance of energy flow, the proper heat to shrink the skin and stimulate skin tightening has maximized the effect and minimized the risk of complications. Please consult with a ThermiRF Certified and Board Certified Plastic Surgeon to evaluate your concerns and consider both the ThermiSMOOTH for the outer skin and the ThermiTIGHT for under the skin to achieve shrinking and tightening. If this is not the best option then you will need a revision to relift and redrape Dear hearsease: The any skin excess in front of and behind the ears. This will by the nature that enough skin may not have been removed with the first procedure require extended incisions and therefore longer scars; usually well hidden within the hairline. I hope this is helpful! All the best!   This information is not meant as medical advice. It is provided solely for education. Our practice would be pleased to discuss your unique circumstances and needs as they relate to these topics.
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